Aromatherapy Amulet For The Baby

Life in the South of China teaches me new things every day. 

For example, I have recently found out that local Guangdong residents make a small hand-stiched amulet for the baby, which is attached to the back of the child’s clothes. It is mostly made with a red piece of cloth. Some people told me there is something inside from a temple – I guessed it was some kind of writing that is supposed to protect the child from harm.

Now coming to the title of my post today. This amulet gave an idea that I could create lovely gifts for my friends who have babies – Aromatherapy Amulet for the Baby.  Instead of a protective writing, it would have a piece of cotton inside and a drop of safe for babies oil could be applied. This amulet can be easily made together with your older children! 

What you will need:

A piece of cloth 

Some cotton

A needle and a thread

A safety pin

Scissors

How to make it:

1. Cut a square shaped piece of cloth (yes, it is a rectangle in the photo. It became a square later!)

2. Stitch along the edge, following the shape of the cloth, with a single stitch. When done, pull slightly by the thread to gather the cloth together. 

3. Fill in the cloth with cotton and pull together. Secured the ends by stitching through them few more stitches. 

4. Open the safety pin and stitch over the non-moving part to attach the amulet to it. Secure the amulet. Close the pin. You have your amulet!

For a young baby not many oils are recommended to use. But such oils as Lavender and Roman Chamomile are my oils on the go with tiny ones. One drop on the amulet and the soothing smell with accompany your little one throughout the day. 

You don’t need to keep the pin on the baby, it can be placed near the crib, and in the pram. Either way, it will be a nice thoughtful handmade gift along with one of the oils to share with your friends. 

Today is the last day of wonderful series – 10 Days of Kid-Made Christmas . Hop over to other blogs who posted today by clicking the links below. 

The Life of Jennifer Dawn

Castle View Academy

Christmas Tree Tassel Decoration

Christmas was not celebrated much in USSR where I grew up. And even now, it is celebrated in January, based on Orthodox Christian calendar. 

Yet, celebrating New Year meant decorating the tree in December, preparing frozen goods, and having the same excitement and anticipation as people around the world have for Christmas. 

If you click on the link above, you will read all about unusual Christmas/New Year’s decorations we put on our trees. I remember clearly at some point we had curtain tassels hanging on our trees!

So today, to commemorate my childhood, I am going to show you how to make DIY Christmas tree Tassels Decoration. It is quick and your kids will have fun. Good thing? You can always use them later on your curtains!

What you will need:

A piece of cardboard

Scissors

White and colorful thread (ours is shiny!)

A needle

Instructions:

1. Draw and cut out a circle from your cardboard.

2. Using the white thread, secure it and roll over in all directions on the circle. Add the colourful thread. Roll as thick as you want your tassel.

3. Secure the ends. Now, using the needle with a thread, go under the treads on one side and secure the middle. 

4. Cut the threads on the other side and tighten the thread you used with the needle. Now you have just a bunch of threads tied up together!

5.  Adjust the treads to look like a tassel, and using white or colorful thread, roll over to decorate the tip which will keep the threads down. 

6. Now make a knot on which the tassel will hang, and cut the ends of the thread to even it out. Voilà!

These tassels will also make great decorations to put around the house!

Every year bloggers of Kid Blogger Network get together to celebrate Christmas and bring you some fun ideas for decorations!

Hop over to Mama Miss to see what other decorations the bloggers have made for you!

Check out other bloggers who posted on the same day with me:


 Rainy Day Mum

Preschool Powol Packets

My Bright Firefly

Happy Brown House

Castle View Academy

The Life of Jennifer Dawn

Schooling Active Monkeys

The Mama Workshop

Plaited Foot Keepsake & Holder

When I was little and went over summer to visit my grandma, my favourite time pass was making plaited with lace foot/shoe holders. In the original method you must use laced ribbon and needle and a thread to stitch everything together. 

So today I want to share with you a variation of my childhood gifts that I made for everyone in the family: Plaited Foot Keepsake & Holder. 

You will need:

– cardboard or cereal box

– marker

– scissors

– gift wrapping ribbons 

– double-sided tape

– hole puncher

How to make your keepsake:

1. Trace your child’s foot on the cardboard. For older children (over 2) you can let them trace by themselves. Cut it out. 

2. Make the top for the keepsake – similar cresent shape. Cut it out. 

3. Now use double sides tape to secure few vertical pieces of ribbon across the foot. Do the same for the horizontal pieces. 

4. Now following the collage, plait them over each other. Repeat with the cresent shaped top.

5. Using double-sided tape, tape some more ribbon on the other side of the sole. 

6. To connect both parts and make a shoes, use the stapler. Or you can stitch them together, too. 

7. Using a hole puncher, punch a hole at the top and put a thread through. 


Your keepsake is ready! And you can use it as a candy holder, too. For Christmas you can use it instead of a stocking! And it will make a lovely gift as well. 

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Please join us for making lovely Kid-Made gift Ideas. Every year several bloggers join together for this amazing project hosted by Teach Me Mommy! Hop over to  Landing Page to see what you have missed and what is coming up!

1,2,3: Montessori Inspired Number Exploration

Learning numbers is something we all do sooner or later. I am not a big fan of learning too much too early but in my years of teaching experience I noticed that it is between 1+ and 3 years old the little once start showing interest in quantities and counting.

So I am happy to share with you a Montessori Inspired Number Exploration I use with toddlers who are already familiar with counting 1,2,3 and 1,2,3,4,5. This exploration prepares them from pre-writing and writing. And it also gives them a better idea of quantities.

Materials needed:

Number cards with a number in front and dots for quantity at the back

5 shells

5 paint brushes

5 cups

5 popsicles sticks

5 large buttons

And anything else you can think of!

How to explore the numbers:

1. Introduce the numbers or review them by slowing picking up each card and placing in front of your child. Have the child point and repeat.

2. Flip the card and use the dots to count again

3. Flip the cards back. Now take any of the objects and place them one by one on each card counting 1 to 5. Give the child enough time to work with the objects..

4. Flip the cards to the side with dots. Now pick any card with any number, count the dots and pick the same amount of one type of objects (for example, 5 dots – 5 shells), placing them next to the card. Give the child enough time to explore and count.

As an extension, the child can count how many buttons or shells you placed in a cup and find that number. 

You can also “paint” over each number or trace over it with an object to promote pre-writing. 

What is the purpose of this activity?

– Learning counting

– Getting familiar with numbers and quantity

– Logical skills

– Fine motor skills

– Pre-writing

31 Days of ABC 2017 | Alldonemonkey.com

It’s time again for another fantastic month of alphabet fun with the 31 Days of ABC!  All this month you can look forward to 31 more days of activities, crafts, books, apps, and more, all dedicated to teaching young children the alphabet.

I am so happy to be working with an amazing group of kid bloggers, who will be sharing their ideas with us in the coming days. So join us as we jump, skip, hop, and read our way through the alphabet this October!

Find more great resources in our series from past years: 31 Days of ABCs 2013, 2014, and 2016!

Don’t forget to follow our 31 Days of ABCs Pinterest board for even more great ABC ideas!

31 Days of ABC

Teaching the ABCs – October 1

All Done Monkey: Early Literacy – Getting Started Teaching the Alphabet

A – October 2

Creative World of Varya: A Is for Aromatherapy for Kids

B – October 3

Hispanic Mama: B Is For Bilingual Baby Books

C – October 4

Witty Hoots: C Is for Cool Fingerprint Castle Keyrings Tutorial

D – October 5

Teach Me Mommy: D Is for Dinosaurs DIY Sensory Bin

E – October 6

E Is for Environmental Print to Develop Literacy

F – October 7

Look! We’re Learning! F Is for Printable Farm Paper Bag Puppets


G – October 8

All Done Monkey: G Is for Go

H – October 9

All Done Monkey: H Is for Hello/Hola

I – October 10

Jeddah Mom: I Is for Ice Cream Craft and Sorting Activity

J – October 11

All Done Monkey: J is for Jirafa (Giraffe) – Spanish Coloring Page

K – October 12

Pennies of Time: K Is for Kindness

L – October 13

Schooling Active Monkeys: L Is for Lion Craft

M – October 14

Sugar, Spice & Glitter: M Is for Madeline Craft

N – October 15

All Done Monkey: N Is for Nature Crafts

O – October 16

Kitchen Counter Chronicles: O Is for Owl Bookmark Printable

P – October 17

Creative World of Varya: P Is for Phonological Awareness in Toddlers

Q – October 18

Discovering the World Through My Son’s Eyes: Q Is for Quito’s Middle of the World Monument Kids Craft

R – October 19

JDaniel4’sMom: R Is for Decorating Robots in Sensory Bags

S – October 20

Discovering the World Through My Son’s Eyes: S Is for Spanish Resources for Kids

T – October 21

Sand In My Toes: T Is for DIY Truck Puzzle

U – October 22

The Educators’ Spin On it: U Is for Unicorn

V – October 23

CrArty: V Is for Van Gogh

W – October 24

My Story Time Corner: W Is for Wheels on the Bus Story Study for Toddlers

X – October 25

In the Playroom: X Marks the Spot – Word and Letter Treasure Hunt

Y – October 26

Teach Me Mommy: Y Is for Yarn Lacing Matching Letters and Words

Z – October 27

Bambini Travel: Z Is for Zoo Animals Learning Activities for All Ages

123’s – October 28

Creative World of Varya: Montessori Inspired Printable

Prewriting – October 29

Witty Hoots

Books, Songs, & Apps – October 30

Witty Hoots: Top 5 List

Printables – October 31

Royal Baloo and Logi-Bear Too

P is for Phonological Awareness in Toddlers

Working with age group birth to 3 years old is my most favourite. It is such an amazing thing – observing a child growing, developing, and learning first step, first words, first emotions. 

Today I’d like to talk about Phonological Awareness in Toddlers. But before I start, let me share with you what it means:

Phonological awareness is the ability to divide spoken language into units, such as words and syllables. Before diving into individual sounds within words (phonemic awareness), we teach children to pay attention to more obvious sounds. We start with environmental noises, then move into sentences, whole words, and then syllables...

Source: Sightwords.com

As a bilingual Montessori instructor I work mostly with children whose first language is not English. And while  phonological awareness in toddlers happens naturally at home where they are in their mother tongue’s environment, in the classroom I have to emphasize it in order to promote proper pronunciation of sounds, words, sentences; assist with general development of the articulation (which can be quite different from the one of  English language); and guide them to making them speak English as comfortably as possible. 

I would like to share some tips and tricks with you that help me in the classroom. You can use them for any language, whether it is a primary one, or a minority one.

1. Read to children. Yes, you already know that! Reading works wonders on language development. But reading with emphasis on sounds and words, enhancing your articulation will shows toddlers and babies how the mouth forms a sound or a word. 

2. Speak clearly in simple sentences. This is important. Young children don’t have a vast vocabulary to understand your sophisticated words. They respond much better to sentences that short and simple. For example, “Please, pick up the toy”, or “Let’s wash hands”. 

3. Avoid baby talk. Even if it is so tempting with that cute little munchkin who is just so adorable! No, really. Avoid it. Words of endearment are fine. But spoken in a creepy voice the sounds get really messed up and there is a lot of confusion! I like how Chinese people I am around do use extra soft vocal intonations when talking to babies but they persist very much when it comes to speaking the sounds properly. After all, phonetically Chinese is quite hard and even for native speakers the process of learning it never stops. 

4. Play games that involve sounds. It could be anything from how the animals talk to how the engines sound. It is fun, and it is helpful. 

5. Sing your heart out! I can never get enough of stressing how much singing the words helps with phonological awareness and pronunciation in general. Even if you are not so gifted with singing, chant the words and rhymes, and songs. We sing a lot of songs in my classes! 

I’d like to add that while I find phonetics a useful and very important part of any language system, I don’t think they should be emphasized and mindlessly taught to any child. So I hope what you read above you take it as a completary part of teaching/learning the language that can assist you in order to make your job cut out for you! 

31 Days of ABC 2017 | Alldonemonkey.com

It’s time again for another fantastic month of alphabet fun with the 31 Days of ABC!  All this month you can look forward to 31 more days of activities, crafts, books, apps, and more, all dedicated to teaching young children the alphabet.

I am so happy to be working with an amazing group of kid bloggers, who will be sharing their ideas with us in the coming days. So join us as we jump, skip, hop, and read our way through the alphabet this October!

Find more great resources in our series from past years: 31 Days of ABCs 2013, 2014, and 2016!

Don’t forget to follow our 31 Days of ABCs Pinterest board for even more great ABC ideas!

31 Days of ABC

Teaching the ABCs – October 1

All Done Monkey: Early Literacy – Getting Started Teaching the Alphabet

A – October 2

Creative World of Varya: A Is for Aromatherapy for Kids

B – October 3

Hispanic Mama: B Is For Bilingual Baby Books

C – October 4

Witty Hoots: C Is for Cool Fingerprint Castle Keyrings Tutorial

D – October 5

Teach Me Mommy: D Is for Dinosaurs DIY Sensory Bin

E – October 6

E Is for Environmental Print to Develop Literacy

F – October 7

Look! We’re Learning! F Is for Printable Farm Paper Bag Puppets


G – October 8

All Done Monkey: G Is for Go

H – October 9

All Done Monkey: H Is for Hello/Hola

I – October 10

Jeddah Mom: I Is for Ice Cream Craft and Sorting Activity

J – October 11

All Done Monkey: J is for Jirafa (Giraffe) – Spanish Coloring Page

K – October 12

Pennies of Time: K Is for Kindness

L – October 13

Schooling Active Monkeys: L Is for Lion Craft

M – October 14

Sugar, Spice & Glitter

N – October 15

All Done Monkey: N Is for Nature Crafts

O – October 16

Kitchen Counter Chronicles: O Is for Owl Bookmark Printable

P – October 17

Creative World of Varya

Q – October 18

Discovering the World Through My Son’s Eyes: Q Is for Quito

R – October 19

JDaniel4’sMom: R Is for Robot

S – October 20

Discovering the World Through My Son’s Eyes: S Is for Spanish

T – October 21

Sand In My Toes: T Is for Truck

U – October 22

The Educators’ Spin On it: U Is for Unicorn

V – October 23

CrArty: V Is for Van Gogh

W – October 24

My Story Time Corner: W Is for Wheels on the Bus

X – October 25

The Mommies Reviews: X

Y – October 26

Teach Me Mommy: Y Is for Yarn Letters

Z – October 27

Bambini Travel: Z Is for Zoo Animals

123’s – October 28

Creative World of Varya: Montessori Inspired Printable

Prewriting – October 29

Witty Hoots

Books, Songs, & Apps – October 30

Witty Hoots: Top 5 List

Printables – October 31

Royal Baloo and Logi-Bear Too

Navrati, Diwali, and Lamp Craft

I’ve always been fond of India. It is such a beautiful and rich in culture country. 

So I am always looking forward to Diwali blog hosted by Multicultural Kid Blogs and take part in it every year!

This year Navrati and Diwali are quite close to each other, I decided to review two books by Bollygrove  about these two festivals, and make a Lamp craft with my children. 

The books I want to talk to you about today are:

–  Let’s Celebrate Navrati  – about a beautiful festival that precedes Diwali;

– Let’s Celebrate 5 Days of Diwali – about the most popular festival in India which is considered the beginning of a new year. 

Learning about these festivals made me think about how similar they are and that this year if you are celebrating both, you can just continue from one to another! 

Both books  tells us about the nature of the festivals, traditions, and share some history of their origine.  They also teach the  vocabulary associated with the festivals.

We learned that Navrati is celebrated for whole 9 days (which is longer than 5 days of Diwali!). We also learned the basics of Dandiya dance, and every tried to dance along the music. We loved all the beautiful colours that are used to decorate houses for Navrati and it reminded us of how colorful Diwali is as well. Clothes, jewelry, decorations – all so festive!

Flipping the pages of the book, we travelled to other parts of India to see how Navrati and Diwali  celebrated there. 

When we read both books, we noticed the emphasis made during both festivals on lights. Garbo (or Garba) is a clay pot lamp that is used during Navrati. And Diya is a small clay lamp used during Diwali. Both lamps are used during religious ceremonies, with Garbo being a representation of goddess Durga (the warrior and the protector), and Diya being used to celebrate victory, cleanliness of the soul, and knowledge. 

To celebrate these two festivals and fill our home with light, we decided to make our own lamps which we decorated inspired by Garbo and lighted in the spirit of Diya. 

Materials needed:

Small glass jars

Washi tape

Stickers

Tea candles
Process:

Start by wrapping your jars with washi tape.

Once done, stick on some colorful stickers.

Drop in tea candles, turn off the light and enjoy the beautiful lamps! 

For now we put off the lamps and will wait to light them up for Diwali!

How do you Celebrate Navrati and Diwali in your home?

Diwali for Kids | Multicultural Kid Blogs

This post is part of the annual Diwali for Kids blog hop from Multicultural Kid Blogs! See the posts below for great ideas on celebrating Diwali with children. You can find even more ideas from last year’s series and on our Diwali Pinterest board:

Ketchup Moms on Multicultural Kid Blogs

Kid World Citizen

Creative World of Varya

Growing Up Gupta

A is for Aromatherapy for Kids 

I am thrilled to be back to annual 31 Days of ABCs, presenting you the first letter of the alphabet: A is for Aromatherapy for Kids.

One of my many hobbies is aromatherapy. I have been using oils and herbs in my home for many many years.  I love oils. I love herbs. Unfortunately, I am allergic to some of them plants, but it doesn’t stop me from using Aromatherapy in my household and for when my family gets sick. 

Here are some fun ways to use oils for your kids and with them. 

1. Aromatherapy play dough. When making play dough, add 1-2 drops of essential oils to match the colors and give a sense of different smell and experience to your child. 

Here are some examples:

– Wild Orange Essential oil for orange color playdough. It is know for boosting the energy and focus when needed.

– Peppermint Essential Oil for green color playdough. This playdough is great to use when your child is congested. 

– Lemon Essential Oil for yellow color playdough. This oils promotes positive mood and cognitive ability. 

– Lavender Essential Oil for blue or purple playdough. Not much needs to be said about Lavender and its soothing properties.

2. Making herbal teas and sharing them together. Chamomile, Chrysanthemum, Rose teas are just few of those that children can drink from as early as 1 year old (in moderate amounts). You can also mix different herbs and dry fruit, get your child’s assistance to put them all in a pot. And ask older children to pour hot water over them herb. Great idea to make teas in transparent cups and pots so you can observe how the leaves open up in hot water. 

3. Herbal baths and foot soaks. These can be done from early on and with older children it could a fun craft project – to make herbal baths sachets. I love these recipes on The Happy Herbal Home .

Do you have any Aromatherapy recipes and ideas to share ? Please leave me a comment! 

31 Days of ABC 2017 | Alldonemonkey.com

It’s time again for another fantastic month of alphabet fun with the 31 Days of ABC!  All this month you can look forward to 31 more days of activities, crafts, books, apps, and more, all dedicated to teaching young children the alphabet.

I am so happy to be working with an amazing group of kid bloggers, who will be sharing their ideas with us in the coming days. So join us as we jump, skip, hop, and read our way through the alphabet this October!

Find more great resources in our series from past years: 31 Days of ABCs 2013, 2014, and 2016!

Don’t forget to follow our 31 Days of ABCs Pinterest board for even more great ABC ideas!

31 Days of ABC

Teaching the ABCs – October 1

All Done Monkey: Early Literacy – Getting Started Teaching the Alphabet

A – October 2

Creative World of Varya: A Is for Aromatherapy Recipes for Kids

B – October 3

Hispanic Mama: B Is For Bilingual

C – October 4

Witty Hoots: C Is for Castles

D – October 5

Teach Me Mommy: D Is for Dinosaur

E – October 6

E Is for Egg Carton Word Building

F – October 7

Look! We’re Learning! F Is for Farm


G – October 8

H – October 9

All Done Monkey: H Is for Hello/Hola

I – October 10

Jeddah Mom: I Is for Ice Cream

J – October 11

K – October 12

Pennies of Time: K Is for Kindness

L – October 13

Schooling Active Monkeys: L Is for Lion

M – October 14

Sugar, Spice & Glitter

N – October 15

O – October 16

Kitchen Counter Chronicles: O Is for Owls

P – October 17

Creative World of Varya

Q – October 18

R – October 19

JDaniel4’sMom: R Is for Robot

S – October 20

Discovering the World Through My Son’s Eyes: S Is for Spanish

T – October 21

Sand In My Toes: T Is for Truck

U – October 22

The Educators’ Spin On it: U Is for Unicorn

V – October 23

W – October 24

X – October 25

Y – October 26

Z – October 27

Bambini Travel: Z Is for Zoo Animals

123’s – October 28

Prewriting – October 29

Books, Songs, & Apps – October 30

Alphabet Clip Cards – October 31

DIY Lebanese Tantour {MKB MENA Series 2017}

If you read my post on our genealogy, you can see that from my husband’s side our family comes from Lebanon. So this time around for MENA Series I decided to make a simple craft that would reflect this side of our heritage. 

Lebanese Traditional clothes are very beautiful. And in fact the ladies’ outfits resemble the ones of gorgeous fairytale princesses. One of the elements in particular that caught my eyes is Tantour – a beautiful headdress that married women of some part of Lebanon used to wear. As I kept looking at different images of Tantour I could see we could easily recreate it from simple materials we had at home. 

So here is how you can make a Tantour with your children.

You will need:

1. Cereal box

2. Scissors

3. Two scarfs

4. One or two thick treads

5. A needles and a sewing thread

6. Stapler

Steps to make your Tantour:


1. Cut out extra sides of the carton box

2. Measure the size of your Tantour by making a conical shape out of the carton on your child’s head.

3. Staple it together and cut off the extra parts to make a cone. Secure it some more staples


4.  Take a smaller scarf and wrap on shiny thread around it. 

5. Wrap it around the cone’s lower part where it would touch the head and secure with a needle and a thread. 

6. Now, attach a bigger scarf to the top of the cone to have it flow down


Your Tantour is ready! 


Girls had fun wearing it and posting for photos. One more accessory to add to our dress up collection.

Do you have a favourite outfit from one of the Middle Eastern or North African countries? Share with me!

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Middle Eastern and North African Heritage Month | Multicultural Kid Blogs

Welcome to the third annual Middle Eastern and North African Heritage Month series from Multicultural Kid Blogs!  Follow along all month long for great resources on teaching children about the heritage of this region, and link up your own posts below. Don’t miss our series from last year and from 2015!

You can also find even more resources on our North Africa and the Middle East Pinterest board:

August 4

Sand In My Toes on Multicultural Kid Blogs: 10 Fun Facts About the United Arab Emirates

August 8

A Crafty Arab: Jordan Craft Stick Flag Tutorial

August 15

Sand In My Toes: Wind Tower Craft (UAE)

August 17

All Done Monkey: MENA Countries Worksheets

August 18

Tiny Tapping Toes: Make Your Own Egyptian Sistrum

August 21

Biracial Bookworms on Multicultural Kid Blogs

August 23

Jeddah Mom: Decorate a Jambiya – Crafts for Kids

August 28

Crafty Moms Share: Ibn al-Haythan –

Father of Optics and Modern Science

August 30

Creative World of Varya

Link Up Your Posts!

   An InLinkz Link-up

   

 

Kindergartens in Zhuhai {Education in China}


I have made it a mission to write about Kindergartens in Zhuhai. However, it took me a while to get to it!

As the time passes by, there are more and more expat families coming to Zhuhai. And one of the first questions is: what is the situation with schools like here?

Today I will share what kinds of kindergartens Zhuhai has to offer. My own children are in a private Chinese kindergarten and a private Chinese primary school. Their education is in Mandarin Chinese, and at home we speak English. 

Disclaimer: these are very general highlights of what the preschool education system in Zhuhai has to offer. The details may vary from place to place, and so do they fees. If you have something to add here – please get in touch with me, or leave a comment so I can correct, edit, or add the information.

I placed all kindergartens in three categories:

Government/Public kindergarten

Main language: Chinese. Usually (but not all) children who graduate from these kindergartens continue into public schools. 

Curriculum: in accordance with the Education Bureau

Extracurricular activities: depends on the budget and the status of the kindergarten. Low-budget kindergartens usually cost less, have less children, and don’t offer any. Kindergartens with better status and funding offer a range of extracurricular activities (dance, sports, arts etc). All extracurricular activities have extra fees.

Starting age: 1.5 – 3 years old.

Fee range: 500 yuan to 2000 yuan tuition, plus, term fees for books and uniforms, meal fees, and bus fees (if applied).

Note: some of these kindergartens hire full time or part-time teachers to offer extra English classes.

Private Kindergartens:
In this category I included all Kindergartens with fully local management, franchises which have local management; and so-called international kindergartens with foreign teachers.

Main language: Chinese. In some kindergartens a bilingual curriculum has been adopted, where foreign teachers spend half a day or full day with children, participating in their daily activities. Usually children who graduate from these kindergartens continue into public or private schools. 

Extracurricular activities: usually plenty, and they cost extra. 

Starting age: 2 – 3 years old. 

Fee range: 2800 to 8000 yuan a month, plus, term fees, and uniform and book fees, meals and bus fees. 

International kindergartens:
The kindergartens that are part of foreign found international education establishments that offer education to expats and locals children from the age of 2-2.5 to 5 years old. This age range is only applicable for 2 fully international schools in Zhuhai: ZIS (Zhuhai International​ School), and QSI (Quality School International).
Main language: English. Chinese is not offered till 5 years old. 

Extracurricular activities: there are some afterschool activities offered for additional fees. 

Starting age: 2-2.5 years old. 

Fees: Currently, the tuition fee for kindergarten around 80,000 yuan, plus, capital fees, meal fees, and bus fees. 

I am currently working on a list of kindergartens that have experience working with foreigners. Please keep an eye on my blog!

6 Quotes About Women from Various Religious Writings

As we continue to celebrate womanhood in the month of March, I have decided to share with you 6 Quotes About Women from Various Religious Writings.

Every Manifestation of God and Prophet has emphasised the importance of women. Some cultures that seem male dominant, in fact have a very strong matriarchal presence and all the important decisions are made by the head of the family – the oldest mother.

We are now living in the era where the equality of men and women is so obvious, that is hurts when it is ignored and misinterpreted. And while quite often we hear how women should be respected, we are still seeing generations of them being brought up in a submissive ways, where they are denied to have their true potential discovered.

Raising very Multicultural kids helps me erase some lines drawn between men and women, or, in the least, make them as transparent as possible. My children, both my girls and my boy, are growing up learning that we treat everyone equally. Growing to understand that any human – a man, or a woman, – has a right to stand up for him/herself, and follow their dreams.

I am grateful to my husband’s parents who were able to instill those very thoughts so deeply in the minds and hearts of their children​, that it is paying of now when we have the children of our own.

I am grateful to my parents who brought me up the way I am and allowing me to pursue my dreams.

To all these wonderful people, and to all my female friends, I dedicate the quotes below. I hope they help you discover who you truly are, dear women!

1. Judaism (Talmudic time):

Women have greater faith than men.- Sides, 133

2. Christianity :

She opens her mouth with wisdom, and the teaching of kindness is on her tongue. – Proverbs, 31:26

3. Hinduism:

Woman has suffered for eons, and that has given her infinite patience and infinite perseverance. – Swami Vivekananda.

4. Buddhism:

A woman, O Lots of the people, may turn out better than a man. She may be wise and virtuous, a devoted wife, revering her mother-in-law. – Sutta Nipada, 3.16

5. Zoroastrianism:

As thus both man or woman knows the duty,  both thoroughly and truly, so let him, or her, declare it and fulfil it…– Yasna, 35.6

6. The Baha’i Faith:

If woman be fully educated and granted her rights, she will attain the capacity for wonderful accomplishments, and prove herself the equal of man. – Abdu’l-Baha, The Promulgation of the Universal Peace, p.136
Women's History Month Series on Multicultural Kid Blogs
Join us for our annual Women’s History Month series, celebrating the contributions and accomplishments of women around the world. Follow along all month plus link up your own posts below! Don’t miss our series from 2016 and 2015, and find even more posts on our Women’s History board on Pinterest:
Follow Multicultural Kid Blogs’s board Women’s History on Pinterest.

March 1
modernmami on Multicultural Kid Blogs: 3 Reasons Why We Celebrate Women’s History Month
March 2
The Jenny Evolution: More Children’s Books About Amazing Women
March 3
Colours of Us: 32 Multicultural Picture Books About Strong Female Role Models
March 6
modernmami: 103 Children’s Books for Women’s History Month
March 7
A Crafty Arab: The Arab Woman Who Carved Exquisite Beauty into Science
March 8
Hispanic Mama: 5 Children’s Books About Latina Women
March 9
MommyMaestra: Free Download – Women’s History Month Trading Cards
March 10
MommyMaestra on MommyMaestra on Multicultural Kid Blogs: Celebrating Women’s History Month
March 13
Crafty Moms Share: First Ladies and Eleanor Roosevelt
March 14
Mama Smiles: Write Down Your Family’s Women’s History
March 15
Bookworms and Owls: Ruth Bader Ginsburg – Associate Justice of the Supreme Court
March 16
Creative World of Varya
March 20
La Cité des Vents on Multicultural Kid Blogs
March 21
Pura Vida Moms
March 22
Melibelle in Tokyo
March 23
All Done Monkey
March 24
playexplorelearn
March 27
Family in Finland
March 28
the piri-piri lexicon
March 30
Let the Journey Begin

Don’t miss our Women’s History Month Activity Printables, on sale now!
Women's History Month Activity Printables